Say Hello to Russia's Hip, New Anti-Protest Anthem

Baby boy, you know you'd rather be thinking about sexy girls and money, sings Alisa Vox.

May 15, 2017 — 21:58
— Update: May. 15 2017 — 19:17
May 15, 2017 — 21:58
— Update: May. 15 2017 — 19:17
Alisa Vox / YouTube

Alisa Vox, formerly a singer in the Russian rock band Leningrad, released a new music video on Monday, titled “Baby Boy.” In the song, Vox mocks a young man for participating in political protests, describing him as a naive underachiever who should focus on his studies, rather than “get into politics.”

“Baby Boy” follows several classroom scandals in recent months, where teachers and lecturers at Russian high schools and universities have been filmed berating students for attending nationwide anti-corruption demonstrations organized by Alexei Navalny on March 26.

In late March, for example, a lecturer at Tomsk State University called his students “freaks” for going to the protests. Two days later, a nearby high school teacher told his classroom that “liberalism is freedom for subhumans.”

Alisa Vox performed in the band Leningrad from 2012 until her stormy exit in March 2016, two months after the group’s smash hit “Eksponat” (Exhibit), where she sang lead vocals. In July 2016, she released a solo album called “On My Own.”

While Leningrad’s founder and lead member, Sergey Shnurov, is generally viewed as a Putin critic, Vox’s “Baby Boy” insults the protesters who marched against corruption on March 26, implying that they are “puppets” being manipulated by Alexei Navalny with promises of “gold and euros.”

Not one to avoid promises of her own, Vox concludes her song by offering Russia’s angry young men “freedom, money, women, and even power,” so long as they cut out the anti-government activism.

The Moscow Times offers a complete, rhyming translation of Vox’s song, punctuated with memorable moments from the musical video.

Baby Boy Alisa Vox

At two o’clock on a sunny day, he heads out for a protest.
His weak hands grip a poster closely to his chest.

There are errors in his sentences.
Typos, I count four.
But his heart is pounding thunderously.
In his eyes he thirsts for war.

Standard protest tomfoolery.
Standard protest tomfoolery.

Learn from your mistakes.
It’s not too late to start.
In your heart, you want a change?
Change yourself, sweetheart.

Learn from your mistakes.
It’s not too late to start.
You want a change, baby boy?
Change yourself, sweetheart.

Just another puppet.
Just another puppet.

He just got back his history test, a big “D” stamped on top.
But someone promised him great riches, so long as he don’t stop.

The kid is just a puppet. All his life, he has lost out.
His mommy chases after him, protecting her cub scout.

Learn from your mistakes.
It’s not too late to start.
In your heart, you want a change?
Change yourself, sweetheart.

Learn from your mistakes.
It’s not too late to start.
You want a change, baby boy?
Change yourself, sweetheart.

The teacher gives Baby Boy some tough love.
The teacher gives Baby Boy some tough love.

Mistake after mistake, he’ll learn to comprehend.
But how many screwups does the kid really intend?

There’s determination in his eyes. He’ll fight. He’ll lay it down.
But come morning it’s off to school, with recess at the playground.

Learn from your mistakes.
It’s not too late to start.
In your heart, you want a change?
Change yourself, sweetheart.

Learn from your mistakes.
It’s not too late to start.
You want a change, baby boy?
Change yourself, sweetheart.

Why think about politics when this woman is hip-thrusting and biting her lip, you little monkey?
Why think about politics when this woman is hip-thrusting and biting her lip, you little monkey?

Freedom, money, girls — you’ll get it all, even power.
So, kid, stay out of politics, and give your brain a shower.