The Soviet Union Through the Lens of an American Spy


Major Martin Manoff, an employee of the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, traveled throughout Russia for two years before being expelled by Soviet authorities on charges of espionage.

Between 1952 - 54, Manoff recorded what he saw in Moscow, Leningrad, Murmansk, Yalta, and along the Trans-Siberian Railroad on color slides and 16mm film.

The photos and video he took, including 15 minutes of color footage of Stalin's funeral from an upstairs window of the old U.S. Embassy, ended up in a closet in his home in Washington State in the United States where it lay unseen for over half a century. Only now, with the death of Manoff’s wife, has his cache of film been discovered.

‘Last Bell’ Tolls for Russia's High School Graduates

On May 26, the “Last Bell” rings at Russian schools. And it's a beloved, hell of a celebration.

see more

Machine Against the Stage: Authorities Target Edgy Theater Director

When masked men raided Moscow's hippest theatre the Gogol Center and interrogated its internationally famous director Kirill Serebrennikov, artists rallied to protest.

Panic Mode: Moscow Probe Into Anti-Gay Purge Has Chechen Leaders Rattled

Moscow sends a delegation to Chechnya to investigate anti-gay crimes, ...

Machine Against the Stage: Authorities Target Edgy Theater Director

When masked men raided Moscow's hippest theatre the Gogol Center and interrogated its internationally famous director Kirill Serebrennikov, ...