Poland Rejects Zhirinovsky's Proposal as Product of 'Sick Mind'

March 26, 2014 — 23:00

Poland Rejects Zhirinovsky's Proposal as Product of 'Sick Mind'

March 26, 2014 — 23:00
Russia's Liberal Democratic party has advised the heads of Poland, Romania and Hungary to hold referendums on taking control of former territories in modern-day Ukraine.

A Polish presidential adviser has dismissed the Russian Liberal Democratic Party's proposal that Warsaw take over parts of Ukraine as the product of a "sick mind" that should be forwarded to a psychiatrist, news reports said.

The Polish Foreign Ministry has also denounced the message as "ridiculous," the Warsaw Business Journal reported on Tuesday.

"We're not taking such proposals seriously," ministry spokesman Marcin Wojciechowski said.

The ministry said it would issue a "courtesy reply," confirming the receipt of the missive but declining to comment on its content.

Polish presidential adviser Tomasz Nalecz said "only a sick mind" could think of a proposal like the one expressed in the LDPR's letter, Poland's Gazeta.pl reported.

"It's an outrage that someone can propose such actions to Poland," Nalecz said, the Warsaw Business Journal reported. "We, as a country, were often hurt by someone else changing our borders in the past, so asking us to participate in partitioning a country that we have friendly relations with is offensive."

He added that the letter should be forwarded to a psychiatrist for evaluation.

Vladimir Zhirinovsky's Liberal Democratic Party said on Monday that it had sent a letter to the leaders of Poland, Romania and Hungary, suggesting that they hold referendums on whether to take over parts of western Ukraine that had once belonged to their respective countries.

Zhirinovsky is known for his trademark flamboyant and provocative comments. The veteran lawmaker also appeared as a singer in New Year's Eve television entertainment programs, told his fellow party members to have sex no more than four times a year, and called for removing the supposedly "repulsive" letter "Ы" from the Russian alphabet.

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